3 ways how context gauges social media campaign success

3 ways how context gauges social media campaign success

There is no set formula for determining the success of a social media campaign. Something along the lines of “if you get over X number of retweets or reach on Facebook, then you were successful” doesn’t apply to the social media campaigns because each has its own unique goals (you are thinking about the goals first, right?)…

Everyone has the ability to learn how to draw

Everyone has the ability to learn how to draw

If you’ve grown tired of seeking out stock photos that no one else already used a million times for your digital content and social media posts, you may consider drawing your own cartoons. You’ll end up with an original image and maybe even a recurring character for future posts! Wait. What’s that you say? You don’t know how to draw? If you’re familiar with the popular comic kxcd, then you can understand how stick figures can still be effective in conveying a message or a concept. It’s what makes napkin drawings so effective. But what if you don’t want to draw stick figures? Perhaps they aren’t a good fit for your brand? You’re still in luck because… Anyone can learn how to draw. Really! When I was in computer animation school way back when dial up Internet was all the rage, the big lesson that was drilled into us was that the computer is only a tool. You still need to know how to draw if you’re planning on making art with it. So I thought I was headed for a really bad grade in art school when one of the compulsory courses was figure drawing. We’d be learning how to draw actual people. With models. I’ve never been able to draw realistic renderings of people. Animals, objects, and aliens, yes. But people, no. So it was to my surprise when on the very first day of class, the professor told us the unexpected – “anyone can learn how to draw”. Except me, I thought. I believed the ability to be able to draw people realistically was a skill you...
How to apply SEO and accessibility to infographics and comics

How to apply SEO and accessibility to infographics and comics

I’m a long time fan of infographics as they can provide a truly engaging way to present data in a visual and easy-to-understand way. I feel the same way about comics as a similar format to convey information with the additional benefit of creating empathy with your audience while educating and entertaining them. However, all that text in graphics is a big no-no. Be mindful of SEO and people using assistive devices such as screen readers, text-to-speech for people with cognitive impairment, and refreshable Braille devices, when posting infographics and comics. Currently, search engines can’t read and index text in images. And people using accessible devices rely on webmasters to take the time to properly describe images. There are two things you can do to fulfil this… 1. Talk about your graphic Add an intro paragraph or an outro paragraph. As long as it’s descriptive of the information in the graphic. In web accessibility circles, this is known as providing a “long text alternative”. Use the keywords your audience is using and other SEO best practices. This way, Google will be satisfied and most importantly, people using assistive devices can enjoy your content. As of this writing, Google likes to give higher rankings to pages with at least 300 words. That may sound like a lot of text to introduce a comic or infographic but really, the quality of your content is what matters now. So make sure your content is worth your audience’s attention in the first place! 2. Use ALT and TITLE tags to their full potential It’s important to fill in those ALT and TITLE tags your...