How to apply SEO and accessibility to infographics and comics

How to apply SEO and accessibility to infographics and comics

I’m a long time fan of infographics as they can provide a truly engaging way to present data in a visual and easy-to-understand way. I feel the same way about comics as a similar format to convey information with the additional benefit of creating empathy with your audience while educating and entertaining them. However, all that text in graphics is a big no-no. Be mindful of SEO and people using assistive devices such as screen readers, text-to-speech for people with cognitive impairment, and refreshable Braille devices, when posting infographics and comics. Currently, search engines can’t read and index text in images. And people using accessible devices rely on webmasters to take the time to properly describe images. There are two things you can do to fulfil this… 1. Talk about your graphic Add an intro paragraph or an outro paragraph. As long as it’s descriptive of the information in the graphic. In web accessibility circles, this is known as providing a “long text alternative”. Use the keywords your audience is using and other SEO best practices. This way, Google will be satisfied and most importantly, people using assistive devices can enjoy your content. As of this writing, Google likes to give higher rankings to pages with at least 300 words. That may sound like a lot of text to introduce a comic or infographic but really, the quality of your content is what matters now. So make sure your content is worth your audience’s attention in the first place! 2. Use ALT and TITLE tags to their full potential It’s important to fill in those ALT and TITLE tags your...
How to ensure your infographics and comics aren’t cut off in news feeds

How to ensure your infographics and comics aren’t cut off in news feeds

That infographic, comic, or other kind of visual you want to post on social networks that you or your team worked on and can’t wait to unleash to the world… may only end up getting parts cut off across social networks. Unfortunately, each social network (and app – they have their own dimensions, too) has its own dimensions for showing visuals in news feeds making it a little time consuming for content producers to have to retrofit visuals so users across networks see what they need to see. Especially any wording.   This is important because a golden rule of user experience design is never expect/assume users will click on your fascinating content without knowing what to expect. They may not think it’s as fascinating as you do. So if part of your promo copy has been cut off on a Twitter feed, your promo will look ugly and incomplete. Not your fault of course. It just makes your hard work a little less engaging. Fortunately, someone has found a one-size-fits-all template. Until the next time social networks and apps make new, quick changes to their sizing. But for now, check out this brilliant post, One Image to Rule Them All: Size Specs to Work Across Social Media, Garrett Heath of Rackspace Digital. It offers a template that works for most major social networks. I gave it a try for the most recent campaign that I ran and it worked like a charm. Show the best part of a long infographic Keep in mind that the dimensions used on social networks tend to be rectangular and horizontal (or square like...
How to use comics to engage your audience

How to use comics to engage your audience

I’ve been drawing newspaper style comics since I was a little kid. I’d create my own characters and send them off on misadventures. In high school, I created Spud, who would later become the protagonist in my Super Spud comic. I drew all my Spud comics in a notebook and showed them to my classmates after a comic was finished. While my drawing skills weren’t exceptional and my plots were silly and simple, my classmates enjoyed my work very much and always asked when Spud will go on his next adventure. I regularly drew recurring and my favourites were parodies of popular culture and when Spud depicted the typical issues of my fellow students (and teachers). In other words, my comics resonated with my audience. “People love comics about their work problems” This quote comes from the fantastic ebook, The Awesome Adventures of Megacorps Marketers (or: How To Use Comics in B2B Content Marketing), by Radix Communications. Founder Fiona Campbell-Howes explains that using comics as a visual medium can create empathy with your audience. “It’s all about the story. Drawing the audience in creating characters they identify with in a world they recognize showing we understand their problems”. This is why, for example, a comic strip like Dilbert has been popular among cubicle dwellers and Family Circus and For Better or For Worse has been popular with families. “And with luck, we also make them laugh” Humour can form a great connection with your audience. In fact, humour is one of the winning ingredients for engaging with your audience on social networks. Of course, comics can also tug at...