3 ways how context gauges social media campaign success

3 ways how context gauges social media campaign success

There is no set formula for determining the success of a social media campaign. Something along the lines of “if you get over X number of retweets or reach on Facebook, then you were successful” doesn’t apply to the social media campaigns because each has its own unique goals (you are thinking about the goals first, right?)…

How I used Periscope at a live event

How I used Periscope at a live event

I’ve dabbled with Periscope and Meerkat with my own personal live streams (such as offering a sneak peek at the progress of my next comic book). Last night was my first time using mobile broadcasting for an event. I had the pleasure of live streaming the very interesting #DisruptHRTO, an event for recruitment and HR professionals sharing new ideas since digital technology has disrupted their industry, too. There were 12 presenters who had 15 seconds for each of the 20 slides they put together on their topic about talent. Tickets for the event sold out pretty quickly so I raised the idea to my friend and co-organizer, Jeff Waldman, of live streaming #DisruptHRTO  for those who weren’t able to attend. We decided to use Periscope over Meerkat because, well, we just liked it better! So, what I did was: Got the word out. Those who couldn’t get tickets needed to know! So we tweeted that the event would be live streamed and included instructions to download the Periscope app and follow me on Twitter. This way, users would have as low a barrier to viewing the event as possible. Periscope (and Meerkat) is a very new app so not many people may have heard about it. Created a promo ad. I created one that was optimized for sharing across social networks so no wording would get cut off in news feeds. Used a tripod. To save my arms during the 2.5 hour event and avoid camera shake, I brought along a tripod and my trusty Joby Grip Tight Mount to hook up my iPhone. Brought my charger cord. This way, I didn’t run out of...

Challenges of community changes

In celebration of Community Manager Appreciation Day (a.k.a. #cmad) on January 26th, one live Google+ hangout after another was broadcast for 24 hours covering a wide variety of topics about community management. I participated in a panel talking about change in communities in hour 20 of the day. Entitled, Change Management: Migrations, Redesigns & Upgrades, Oh My!, we talked about how change is inevitable and the best practices in dealing with negative comments, how to communicate the change, not-so-popular decisions by upper management, technical breakdowns, and more. I was in good company with many veterans in the industry representing a wide variety of communities in many sectors; Allison Carney, Patrick Cleary, Scott Moore, Lauri Travis, and host, Jenn Emerson. I provided the perspective from migrating corporate websites owned by a corporate communications team. A complaint is a gift One of my favourite takeaways from our discussion was a quote from Scott Moore who said that “A complaint is a gift”. While no one wishes to receive any complaints or negative comments, they do provide valuable learnings that can improve your product/community/whathaveyou. I believe it was Allison Carney who shared her experiences with this. Your organization can benefit from both positive and negative comments. If it weren’t for some unexpected negative feedback that I’ve received for Stuttering is Cool, I wouldn’t have come up with an idea for an awareness campaign that generated a lot of reach on Twitter, Facebook, and even Tumblr! Which, in turn, generated a lot of new insight from audience comments (all positive). You are the member advocate Another favourite take away came from a discussion about how the community...

What does podcasting look like in 2013?

Looking to relaunch his podcast, my friend and fellow podcaster, Sylvain Grand’Maison, recently asked on the Podcast Artifacts Facebook group what is important to add on a website for a podcast in 2013. Back in the 2000’s, an RSS feed was vital, buttons to various podcatchers, email subscriptions and of course, an audio player. But are they relevant in today’s world where the website is just one piece to the content consumer’s toolbox? Sylvain’s question really made me think. The audience of my podcast, Stuttering is Cool, is mostly non-tech so I have always kept and tweaked the podcatchers buttons on my website. And I also offer email notifications (let’s face it, podcasting has never been as easy to access as traditional radio). Then again, I also designed my website to work like a radio. Just press play. So what kind of advice did other group members give Sylvain? In a nutshell, add the traditional stuff since it’s a best practice to ensure all levels of technological knowledge has been accommodated. Don’t forget accessibility as well! 1. RSS feeds still serve a purpose for apps like Flipboard and Google Currents. 2. Email subscription can be effective if your audience is low-tech. Remember, just because you are a techie, doesn’t mean your entire audience is as well (and you shouldn’t ignore the non-techies). Unless, of course, the topic of your podcast is tech in nature, then you can safely assume some level of knowledge. And just because you have a website or blog doesn’t mean people will take the initiative and return often. The web is very noisy now and...

Oh the benefits of failure!

I had the fortunate opportunity to attend TAHSN Education Day 2013 with my day job team a few weeks ago. The annual conference is a collaboration among communications departments of teaching hospitals (which is what the TAHSN refers to: Toronto Academic Health Science Network). Held at Sunnybrook Hospital, this year’s theme was social media and the day was filled topics from brand storytelling to crisis management and learning from failure. We’ve heard from fellow TASHN hospital communicators and social media experts, Mark Farmer of York University, Boyd Neil from H+K Strategies, and Leslie Church of Google Canada. Some of my take aways: 1. Multi-channel roll out is a big job I can attest to this from rolling out messages of my various projects. Every social channel comes with its own set of rules and needs for maintenance and tender loving care. And you should also be mindful of SEO ensuring each channel doesn’t duplicate copy which deters Google. Remember, every social channel has its own distinct type of audience. What may work for YouTube may not for Vine. What may work for Twitter may not for a Facebook or Google+ page. This is also a reason why true social engagement is not a part time job. 2. Appeal to the heart when telling stories Powerful stories appeal to the heart and rational mind. Well crafted stories trigger action. This is why fundraisers typically feature a person’s story about their challenge(s). Tugging at our hearts, we will feel empowered to help that person through our call to action. 3. Tap into the pulse of conversations instead of trying to start...