Daniele Rossi, Digital and content strategy
LinkedIn
Dribbble
Google Plus
Twitter
Pinterest
Flickr
Delicious
YouTube

Add a third set of eyes to your process

Sunday, January 20th, 2013

I’ve been noticing a lot of errors in semantics across blogs and even articles by major media outlets lately. And emails, too.

Sentences that make no sense at all because one word was mistyped or auto-corrected without the author realizing. That word will be skipped by spell checkers and well, I haven’t seen grammar checkers outside of MS Word*.

That one misused word makes all the difference in figuring out what you are intending to say and how professional you will appear to be. It’s distracting. I spend time trying to figure out the intended word so I can piece the two sentence fragments together.

Authors are either not having someone take a look at their work before publishing or someone is having a look but they are doing it on a screen.

I’m making the correlation that we tend to scan paragraphs on a screen and miss potential errors when proofing. Printing your text out on paper makes proof reading more effective.

Sometimes I read the text backwards. From ending to beginning. This way I’m looking at the words in case any of them sticks out.

I know we work in a tight deadline, overworked, not-enough-hours-in-the-day and Google-ate-my-brain world, however, showing your work to another set of eyes needs to be part of the digital publishing process.

I came across three such misused words in my blog post alone as I was proofing.

*On second thought, maybe there are grammar checkers in other programs and I just don’t know about them?


Tags: , , ,

Comments

  1. Great blog post! I definitely agree that taking the time to review your content and having a fresh set of eyes review it as well is a necessary part of the process.

    For me personally, I find that having an objective person to have a look at my content goes a long way. Sometimes, I find that, after working on an article for a few weeks, having someone to take a look, who has never read it nor knows the material, can help me catch things I’ve overlooked.

  2. Excellent tip, Sam! Tunnelvision is another obstacle to publishing great content.

  3. Rob Lee says:

    I like to call that misfeature “auto-corrupt” since it does that at least as much as it corrects :)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

next post: Beautiful graffiti mural in Toronto
previous post: Death by infographic